Encompassing much more than music history, the Musicology Program at Northwestern approaches music as a social activity shaped by aesthetic movements and intellectual theories – in essence, the humanistic study of music in culture.

Students are invited to view music through an interdisciplinary lens to reveal cultural contexts and meanings not accessible through the study of music notation alone. By integrating the perspectives of historical musicology and ethnomusicology, the program trains open-minded yet critical scholars adaptable to varied repertoires and academic strategies, in an atmosphere of collegiality and peer support.

The graduate student support provided to PhD students includes year-round tuition and stipend and fully subsidized health insurance.

About the Musicology Program

The internationally-renowned musicology faculty is the program’s greatest asset.

Their collective expertise covers all periods of traditional music history as well as neglected geographies that are gaining increasing prominence in the field, such as the former Soviet Republics, Spain, Britain, the Middle East, and Latin America. A particular program strength is eighteenth-century studies. All of these areas, coupled with Northwestern’s historic strength in African and African-American studies, create a group of specializations that is unique to Northwestern.

The PhD degree program is truly interdisciplinary in design, requiring coursework in a cognate area in the humanities or social sciences. The musicology coursework reflects the wide interests of the faculty and its interdisciplinary approaches. Students are regular presenters of academic papers at regional, national, and international conferences, and have received prestigious fellowships and awards, as well as academic placements, after graduation.

The Musicology Program is enhanced by its location at a major research university and within a prominent school of music. Because the University is dedicated to interdisciplinary study, the Musicology program gains support from a campus-wide network of scholars who are open to collaboration. A vibrant performance culture includes more than 400 concerts each year. Students also benefit from the multi-faceted scholarly community, research libraries, and thriving musical cultures of both Evanston and Chicago.

Northwestern University Music Library

Among the largest music collections in the U.S., the Northwestern University Music Library has an unmatched strength in 20th century and contemporary classical music, and holds at least one copy of nearly every new score published since 1945.

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Degree Information

Bachelor’s Degrees

The Bachelor of Music degree with concentration in musicology combines broad training in the field of music history with limited performance study. The curriculum provides a balanced exposure to music of all periods and offers studies in the analysis of music, foreign language, ethnomusicology, and related areas.
See Bachelor of Music Requirements

The Bachelor of Arts in Music degree permits a wider selection of liberal arts courses, but less time for musical performance.
See Bachelor of Arts Requirements

The Bachelor of Science in Music degree is a non-admitting degree and is identical to the BA degree with the exception of no foreign language requirement and no senior project requirement.
See Bachelor of Science Requirements

Master of Music

The MM in Musicology is a one-year intensive, comprehensive degree that immerses students in all periods of Western music history as well as select topics in popular and global music. The course of study also introduces students to current research methods in Musicology and Ethnomusicology.

The Master of Music requires the completion of 12 courses (4 each quarter), normally during a residency of one year. The terminal requirement is the public professional presentation of original research completed in the course of study for the degree.
See Master of Music Requirements

PhD in Music

The PhD in Music with musicology specialization exposes students to a variety of musical styles and research methods. Although the program offers advanced degrees only in Western studies, students are encouraged to take courses in ethnomusicology. Admission is selective and the department is small so that students have easy access to the faculty. All students receive full tuition and a living stipend so that they may fully devote themselves to research and study.

The degree requires 18 courses beyond the MM degree, 3 each quarter during the two years of residency. The terminal requirement involves language proficiency in two European languages, a comprehensive examination in music history and theory, and a dissertation.

See PhD Requirements

Musicology Graduate Students

3rd year PhD

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Olivia Cacchione

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3rd year PhD

OliviaCacchione2021@u.northwestern.edu

Olivia Cacchione is a third-year PhD student in musicology. She holds Master's degrees from University of Washington in Music History and Harp Performance. Her work focuses on music, magic, and modernity in England and the United States. Her dissertation examines the role of music in 19th and early 20th century spiritualist séances and its relationship with mediated sound production in the 20th century. With the aid of a fellowship from the Social Science Research Council, she spent the summer of 2018 conducting archival research in England. She also maintains strong interests in British and American popular musics and music in film and television. She has presented her work on country music and advertising at the Society for American Music and the American Musicological Society-Midwest conferences.

PhD Candidate

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Jenna Harmon

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PhD Candidate

jennaharmon2017@u.northwestern.edu

Jenna Harmon is a PhD candidate (ABD) in musicology, and is enrolled in Northwestern’s Gender and Sexualities Studies Certificate program. She holds degrees in musicology (MA, Northwestern) and music (BA, Drake University). With the support of a Fulbright Fellowship to France (2016-2017), she has conducted research towards her dissertation project on the intersection of music, politics, and pornography in obscene media printed in Paris in the latter half of the eighteenth century. Jenna has presented at the local and national levels, including at the annual meetings of the American Musicological Society and the Society for French Historical Studies, and is currently a Visiting Scholar at Duke University.

PhD Candidate

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Kyle Kaplan

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PhD Candidate

kylekaplan2014@u.northwestern.edu

Kyle Kaplan is a PhD candidate in Musicology and a Mellon Interdisciplinary Cluster Fellow with the Gender and Sexuality Studies program. He holds a BA from UCLA in Music History and an MA from McGill University in Musicology with an emphasis in Gender, Sexuality and Feminist Studies. His dissertation, "Music, Intimacy, and International Homosexual Collaborations, 1957-1963," reconstructs the social and creative networks of composers such as Henze, Barber, Britten, and Poulenc. This project documents their interest in 19th century aesthetics in counterpoint with Adorno's contemporaneous writings on aesthetics, ethics, and intimacy. Further research projects consider the soundtrack's of gay experimental erotic cinema and the biopolitics of music and modernist dance. The first of these will appear in article form as part of the 2018 special issue of Women and Music titled "Racing Queer Music Scholarship." He has presented papers at meetings of the Society for American Music, Feminist Theory and Music, Music and the Middlebrow, and the American Musicological Society's LGBTQ and Dance Study Groups, and has served on the board of the LGBTQ Study Group.

PhD Candidate

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Emily Lane

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PhD Candidate

emilylane1.2013@u.northwestern.edu

Emily Lane is a PhD candidate (ABD) holding a MM in Musicology from Northwestern and a BM with Honors in Vocal Performance from Miami University of Ohio. Emily’s research concentrates on mid-20th century American Hollywood media, radio, and musical performance through interdisciplinary scholarship in sound studies. Focusing on adaptations of the film musical to radio, her dissertation investigates the spectacle of the Hollywood musical tradition within an aural media. In 2016, she attended the Summer Institute in Cologne [sic!] with a concentration in sound studies and received a graduate research grant for archival work in Southern California. Presenting original research at several national and international conferences, Emily has given talks at the conference of the International Association for the Study of Popular Music, the Music and the Moving Image Conference at NYU, Song, Stage, and Screen XI, Sounding Out the Space at the Dublin School of Creative Arts and the national conference of the American Musicological Society. 

At Northwestern, Emily has served in leadership roles for the International Student Orientation, Graduate Leadership and Advocacy Council (GLAC), the New TA Conference, and has participated in the “University Seminar” series with Dean McBride. She worked as a Teaching Consultant for the Searle Center, receiving a teaching certificate through NU’s Searle Center in 2016. Currently, Emily is the Graduate Assistant at the Alice Kaplan Institute for Humanities.

Olivia Cacchione

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3rd year PhD

OliviaCacchione2021@u.northwestern.edu

Olivia Cacchione is a third-year PhD student in musicology. She holds Master's degrees from University of Washington in Music History and Harp Performance. Her work focuses on music, magic, and modernity in England and the United States. Her dissertation examines the role of music in 19th and early 20th century spiritualist séances and its relationship with mediated sound production in the 20th century. With the aid of a fellowship from the Social Science Research Council, she spent the summer of 2018 conducting archival research in England. She also maintains strong interests in British and American popular musics and music in film and television. She has presented her work on country music and advertising at the Society for American Music and the American Musicological Society-Midwest conferences.

Jenna Harmon

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PhD Candidate

jennaharmon2017@u.northwestern.edu

Jenna Harmon is a PhD candidate (ABD) in musicology, and is enrolled in Northwestern’s Gender and Sexualities Studies Certificate program. She holds degrees in musicology (MA, Northwestern) and music (BA, Drake University). With the support of a Fulbright Fellowship to France (2016-2017), she has conducted research towards her dissertation project on the intersection of music, politics, and pornography in obscene media printed in Paris in the latter half of the eighteenth century. Jenna has presented at the local and national levels, including at the annual meetings of the American Musicological Society and the Society for French Historical Studies, and is currently a Visiting Scholar at Duke University.

Kyle Kaplan

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PhD Candidate

kylekaplan2014@u.northwestern.edu

Kyle Kaplan is a PhD candidate in Musicology and a Mellon Interdisciplinary Cluster Fellow with the Gender and Sexuality Studies program. He holds a BA from UCLA in Music History and an MA from McGill University in Musicology with an emphasis in Gender, Sexuality and Feminist Studies. His dissertation, "Music, Intimacy, and International Homosexual Collaborations, 1957-1963," reconstructs the social and creative networks of composers such as Henze, Barber, Britten, and Poulenc. This project documents their interest in 19th century aesthetics in counterpoint with Adorno's contemporaneous writings on aesthetics, ethics, and intimacy. Further research projects consider the soundtrack's of gay experimental erotic cinema and the biopolitics of music and modernist dance. The first of these will appear in article form as part of the 2018 special issue of Women and Music titled "Racing Queer Music Scholarship." He has presented papers at meetings of the Society for American Music, Feminist Theory and Music, Music and the Middlebrow, and the American Musicological Society's LGBTQ and Dance Study Groups, and has served on the board of the LGBTQ Study Group.

Emily Lane

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PhD Candidate

emilylane1.2013@u.northwestern.edu

Emily Lane is a PhD candidate (ABD) holding a MM in Musicology from Northwestern and a BM with Honors in Vocal Performance from Miami University of Ohio. Emily’s research concentrates on mid-20th century American Hollywood media, radio, and musical performance through interdisciplinary scholarship in sound studies. Focusing on adaptations of the film musical to radio, her dissertation investigates the spectacle of the Hollywood musical tradition within an aural media. In 2016, she attended the Summer Institute in Cologne [sic!] with a concentration in sound studies and received a graduate research grant for archival work in Southern California. Presenting original research at several national and international conferences, Emily has given talks at the conference of the International Association for the Study of Popular Music, the Music and the Moving Image Conference at NYU, Song, Stage, and Screen XI, Sounding Out the Space at the Dublin School of Creative Arts and the national conference of the American Musicological Society. 

At Northwestern, Emily has served in leadership roles for the International Student Orientation, Graduate Leadership and Advocacy Council (GLAC), the New TA Conference, and has participated in the “University Seminar” series with Dean McBride. She worked as a Teaching Consultant for the Searle Center, receiving a teaching certificate through NU’s Searle Center in 2016. Currently, Emily is the Graduate Assistant at the Alice Kaplan Institute for Humanities.

1st year PhD

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Brooke Little

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1st year PhD

Q4A4T6@u.northwestern.edu

Brooke is a first year PhD student in musicology. She holds a BM in Voice Performance (2005) and also an MME in Vocal Music Education (2008) both from the University of Missouri-Columbia. After which time she spent seven years teaching choir and general music in Kansas City, in primarily urban settings. She also holds a MM in Musicology from the University of Missouri- Kansas City (2017). Her thesis "The Musical Education and Involvement of the Six Wives of Henry VIII", focuses on questions of gender, sexuality, female education and performance in the first half of the English sixteenth century. She has presented selections from her work at the Sixteenth Century Society conference. When not studying, she enjoys spending time with her husband and cats.

2nd year PhD

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Emily Masincup

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2nd year PhD

EmilyMasincup2022@u.northwestern.edu

Emily Masincup is a first-year PhD student in Musicology. She received her BM in Music Performance from Messiah College, PA (2014), and her MA in Music from Cardiff University, Wales (2016). Her master’s thesis, entitled “Rings and Other Gendered Spaces: Musical Representations of Gender in Peter Jackson’s The Lord of the Rings Films,” seeks to establish unique connections between Howard Shore’s score and different types of space present within the films—literal and/or metaphorical—in order to illuminate subversive readings of gender. She maintains a strong interest in film music, and is especially thrilled when her explorations of film sound lead her into the territory of media studies. Emily also researches historical and contemporary conceptualizations of the human voice/vocality and hopes to combine this research with her film interests by examining representations of musical vocality within film. When she is not studying, she enjoys working on Kakuro puzzles, snuggling with cats, and singing with Northwestern’s University Chorale.

2nd year PhD

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Simon Nugent

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2nd year PhD

SimonNugent2022@u.northwestern.edu

Simon Nugent is a second-year PhD student in musicology. He earned a Bachelor of Music and Master of Musicology degrees from University College Dublin (UCD). Simon’s research interests include music and audiovisual media, medieval music, and Celtic music. In 2016, he co-organised a meeting of the International Musicological Society’s medieval music study group, Cantus Planus, co-sponsored by UCD and the University of Notre Dame. In the same year, he was co-editor of Issue 9 of The Musicology Review, a peer-reviewed postgraduate publication based at UCD. His transcription of the divine office of Saint Malachy will be published in 2019, and his research on Celtic music as medieval music in Hollywood cinema was published as part of an edited volume entitled Recomposing the Past: Early Music on Stage and Screen, by Routledge press in early 2018. Simon has presented at conferences throughout Ireland and the UK, including the Royal Musical Association Research Students’ Conference and Society for Musicology in Ireland’s postgraduate and annual plenary conferences.

1st year Master's

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Grace Pechianu

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1st year Master's

GracePechianu2018@u.northwestern.edu

Grace Pechianu is a Master's degree student in Musicology. She graduated from Northwestern University (2018) where she received her Bachelor’s degree with concentrations in Musicology and Violin Performance. Grace is interested in the area where music and literature intersect. In her thesis, she investigated representations of the Faust legend in instrumental genres. Grace was awarded the American Bach Society’s Frances Brokaw Grant for an internship at the Riemenschneider Bach Institute Summer of 2018. In September 2018, she presented her research on musical compositions related to Thomas Mann’s Doktor Faustus at the American Musicological Society’s Midwest chapter meeting. Grace is currently researching the use of early electronic instruments in multimedia works. She also enjoys kayaking, cooking, and painting in her spare time.

Brooke Little

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1st year PhD

Q4A4T6@u.northwestern.edu

Brooke is a first year PhD student in musicology. She holds a BM in Voice Performance (2005) and also an MME in Vocal Music Education (2008) both from the University of Missouri-Columbia. After which time she spent seven years teaching choir and general music in Kansas City, in primarily urban settings. She also holds a MM in Musicology from the University of Missouri- Kansas City (2017). Her thesis "The Musical Education and Involvement of the Six Wives of Henry VIII", focuses on questions of gender, sexuality, female education and performance in the first half of the English sixteenth century. She has presented selections from her work at the Sixteenth Century Society conference. When not studying, she enjoys spending time with her husband and cats.

Emily Masincup

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2nd year PhD

EmilyMasincup2022@u.northwestern.edu

Emily Masincup is a first-year PhD student in Musicology. She received her BM in Music Performance from Messiah College, PA (2014), and her MA in Music from Cardiff University, Wales (2016). Her master’s thesis, entitled “Rings and Other Gendered Spaces: Musical Representations of Gender in Peter Jackson’s The Lord of the Rings Films,” seeks to establish unique connections between Howard Shore’s score and different types of space present within the films—literal and/or metaphorical—in order to illuminate subversive readings of gender. She maintains a strong interest in film music, and is especially thrilled when her explorations of film sound lead her into the territory of media studies. Emily also researches historical and contemporary conceptualizations of the human voice/vocality and hopes to combine this research with her film interests by examining representations of musical vocality within film. When she is not studying, she enjoys working on Kakuro puzzles, snuggling with cats, and singing with Northwestern’s University Chorale.

Simon Nugent

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2nd year PhD

SimonNugent2022@u.northwestern.edu

Simon Nugent is a second-year PhD student in musicology. He earned a Bachelor of Music and Master of Musicology degrees from University College Dublin (UCD). Simon’s research interests include music and audiovisual media, medieval music, and Celtic music. In 2016, he co-organised a meeting of the International Musicological Society’s medieval music study group, Cantus Planus, co-sponsored by UCD and the University of Notre Dame. In the same year, he was co-editor of Issue 9 of The Musicology Review, a peer-reviewed postgraduate publication based at UCD. His transcription of the divine office of Saint Malachy will be published in 2019, and his research on Celtic music as medieval music in Hollywood cinema was published as part of an edited volume entitled Recomposing the Past: Early Music on Stage and Screen, by Routledge press in early 2018. Simon has presented at conferences throughout Ireland and the UK, including the Royal Musical Association Research Students’ Conference and Society for Musicology in Ireland’s postgraduate and annual plenary conferences.

Grace Pechianu

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1st year Master's

GracePechianu2018@u.northwestern.edu

Grace Pechianu is a Master's degree student in Musicology. She graduated from Northwestern University (2018) where she received her Bachelor’s degree with concentrations in Musicology and Violin Performance. Grace is interested in the area where music and literature intersect. In her thesis, she investigated representations of the Faust legend in instrumental genres. Grace was awarded the American Bach Society’s Frances Brokaw Grant for an internship at the Riemenschneider Bach Institute Summer of 2018. In September 2018, she presented her research on musical compositions related to Thomas Mann’s Doktor Faustus at the American Musicological Society’s Midwest chapter meeting. Grace is currently researching the use of early electronic instruments in multimedia works. She also enjoys kayaking, cooking, and painting in her spare time.

4th year PhD

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Nathan Reeves

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4th year PhD

NathanReeves2020@u.northwestern.edu

Nathan is a Ph.D. candidate in musicology with a cognate focus in anthropology. He holds a BM in Vocal Performance from Furman University and a MM in Musicology from the University of Tennessee, Knoxville with a concentration in medieval and renaissance studies. Nathan’s primary research focuses on musical life of the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries in Spanish-occupied southern Italy. His dissertation project examines how musical representations of subaltern populations intersected with the production of urban space in the city of Naples. This work is particularly attuned to state practices of spatial and sonic regulation that developed under Spanish colonialism. Nathan pursues complementary research in the history of ethnomusicology, particularly concerning approaches to sound recording and transcription. Additional interests include sound studies, Indigenous studies, gender and sexuality studies, postcolonial theory, and ethnography. Nathan has presented his research at a number of conferences, including meetings of the American Musicological Society, the Society for Ethnomusicology, the Sixteenth Century Society, Binghamton University’s Center for Medieval and Renaissance Studies, and at events hosted by the Newberry Library of Chicago. He currently serves as Co-Coordinator for Northwestern’s Early Modern Colloquium. In addition to his scholarly pursuits, he remains an avid singer in ensembles of the Chicago area.

PhD Candidate

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Jason Rosenholtz-Witt

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PhD Candidate

jasonrosenholtzwitt2019@u.northwestern.edu

Jason Rosenholtz-Witt is a PhD candidate in the musicology program and a Northwestern Presidential Fellow. His dissertation, "Musical Networks on the Borders of the Venetian Republic, 1580–1630," examines the mediation and circulation of music through social and professional networks with an emphasis on Bergamo, a thriving musical center during this period. By documenting the movement of both physical musical objects and ephemeral ideas, Jason’s research reveals a complex and international network of musicians, composers, artists, scribes, patrons, religious figures, and diplomats engaged in musical production. He earned a Bachelor’s in double bass performance from the University of Northern Colorado (2005), and a Master’s in performance from Colorado State University (2011). Between degrees, Jason spent four years teaching English in Hiroshima, Japan. He has published on seventeenth-century music in The Viol and Early Music Performer. Jason maintains a secondary interest in twentieth-century experimentalism and contributed a chapter in A Feast of Astonishments: Charlotte Moorman and the Avant Garde, 1960s-70s. He has presented his research at numerous conferences, including the North American British Music Studies Association, Medieval/Renaissance Music, Sixteenth Century Studies, Renaissance Society of America, Society for Music Theory, and American Musicological Society. Jason's research has been supported by a Dr. Gudrun Busch Fellowship from the Herzog August Bibliothek (Wolfenbüttel, Germany), and a grant from the Gladys Krieble Delmas Foundation for archival research in Bergamo, Italy. Additionally, Jason is a Graduate-Scholar-In-Residence at the Newberry Library in Chicago.

PhD student (on leave)

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Milena Schaller

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PhD student (on leave)

MilenaSchaller2015@u.northwestern.edu

Milena Schaller is a PhD student (currently on leave of absence) in Musicology who previously earned a BA at UC Davis and a MA at Washington University in St. Louis. Her dissertation, heavily based on reception and criticism, explores the arrival of the Ballets russes in Paris and their connection to nostalgia, puppetry, French theatre, and Franco-Russian political events. She has presented on this topic at the Annual Conference of the Francophone Music Criticism Network in Paris, and at the conference on Artistic Migration and Identity in Paris in Montréal; her chapter on this subject will appear in Migration artistique et identité: Paris, 1870-1950 (Forthcoming, 2019). She also studies ideas of heritage, culture, and the mythic past in Folk Metal bands of the 2000s; she has presented on folk metal at the Midwest Graduate Music Consortium, the International Conference on Music Since 1900 held in Glasgow, Scotland, and the Analytical Approaches to World Music conference. As a cellist, she aims for performer and listener-centric musical analysis. When not baking a mean spiked banana bread and some darn good pie, she can be found making puppets of all kinds.

1st Year Masters

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Kaylee Simmons

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1st Year Masters

KayleeSimmons2019@u.northwestern.edu

Kaylee Ann Simmons is a Musicology Master’s student at Northwestern University. Her research interests primarily concern music and gender studies within the context of early modern Europe, a topic which she intends to continue exploring as a doctoral student. A musician as well as academic, Kaylee aims to use her research to influence performances of pre-1750 repertoires, and frequently does so in Europe. With the support of an Honors Research Grant and URCO (Undergraduate Research and Creative Opportunities) grant from Utah State University, Kaylee conducted the research for her undergraduate thesis, “Vocal Vibrato in Early Music,” in the United Kingdom. More recently, she spent a year in the Netherlands studying and performing works written in early forms of musical notation. Now, back in the United States, Kaylee is excited to build upon her studies abroad with the faculty and students at Northwestern University.

Nathan Reeves

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4th year PhD

NathanReeves2020@u.northwestern.edu

Nathan is a Ph.D. candidate in musicology with a cognate focus in anthropology. He holds a BM in Vocal Performance from Furman University and a MM in Musicology from the University of Tennessee, Knoxville with a concentration in medieval and renaissance studies. Nathan’s primary research focuses on musical life of the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries in Spanish-occupied southern Italy. His dissertation project examines how musical representations of subaltern populations intersected with the production of urban space in the city of Naples. This work is particularly attuned to state practices of spatial and sonic regulation that developed under Spanish colonialism. Nathan pursues complementary research in the history of ethnomusicology, particularly concerning approaches to sound recording and transcription. Additional interests include sound studies, Indigenous studies, gender and sexuality studies, postcolonial theory, and ethnography. Nathan has presented his research at a number of conferences, including meetings of the American Musicological Society, the Society for Ethnomusicology, the Sixteenth Century Society, Binghamton University’s Center for Medieval and Renaissance Studies, and at events hosted by the Newberry Library of Chicago. He currently serves as Co-Coordinator for Northwestern’s Early Modern Colloquium. In addition to his scholarly pursuits, he remains an avid singer in ensembles of the Chicago area.

Jason Rosenholtz-Witt

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PhD Candidate

jasonrosenholtzwitt2019@u.northwestern.edu

Jason Rosenholtz-Witt is a PhD candidate in the musicology program and a Northwestern Presidential Fellow. His dissertation, "Musical Networks on the Borders of the Venetian Republic, 1580–1630," examines the mediation and circulation of music through social and professional networks with an emphasis on Bergamo, a thriving musical center during this period. By documenting the movement of both physical musical objects and ephemeral ideas, Jason’s research reveals a complex and international network of musicians, composers, artists, scribes, patrons, religious figures, and diplomats engaged in musical production. He earned a Bachelor’s in double bass performance from the University of Northern Colorado (2005), and a Master’s in performance from Colorado State University (2011). Between degrees, Jason spent four years teaching English in Hiroshima, Japan. He has published on seventeenth-century music in The Viol and Early Music Performer. Jason maintains a secondary interest in twentieth-century experimentalism and contributed a chapter in A Feast of Astonishments: Charlotte Moorman and the Avant Garde, 1960s-70s. He has presented his research at numerous conferences, including the North American British Music Studies Association, Medieval/Renaissance Music, Sixteenth Century Studies, Renaissance Society of America, Society for Music Theory, and American Musicological Society. Jason's research has been supported by a Dr. Gudrun Busch Fellowship from the Herzog August Bibliothek (Wolfenbüttel, Germany), and a grant from the Gladys Krieble Delmas Foundation for archival research in Bergamo, Italy. Additionally, Jason is a Graduate-Scholar-In-Residence at the Newberry Library in Chicago.

Milena Schaller

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PhD student (on leave)

MilenaSchaller2015@u.northwestern.edu

Milena Schaller is a PhD student (currently on leave of absence) in Musicology who previously earned a BA at UC Davis and a MA at Washington University in St. Louis. Her dissertation, heavily based on reception and criticism, explores the arrival of the Ballets russes in Paris and their connection to nostalgia, puppetry, French theatre, and Franco-Russian political events. She has presented on this topic at the Annual Conference of the Francophone Music Criticism Network in Paris, and at the conference on Artistic Migration and Identity in Paris in Montréal; her chapter on this subject will appear in Migration artistique et identité: Paris, 1870-1950 (Forthcoming, 2019). She also studies ideas of heritage, culture, and the mythic past in Folk Metal bands of the 2000s; she has presented on folk metal at the Midwest Graduate Music Consortium, the International Conference on Music Since 1900 held in Glasgow, Scotland, and the Analytical Approaches to World Music conference. As a cellist, she aims for performer and listener-centric musical analysis. When not baking a mean spiked banana bread and some darn good pie, she can be found making puppets of all kinds.

Kaylee Simmons

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1st Year Masters

KayleeSimmons2019@u.northwestern.edu

Kaylee Ann Simmons is a Musicology Master’s student at Northwestern University. Her research interests primarily concern music and gender studies within the context of early modern Europe, a topic which she intends to continue exploring as a doctoral student. A musician as well as academic, Kaylee aims to use her research to influence performances of pre-1750 repertoires, and frequently does so in Europe. With the support of an Honors Research Grant and URCO (Undergraduate Research and Creative Opportunities) grant from Utah State University, Kaylee conducted the research for her undergraduate thesis, “Vocal Vibrato in Early Music,” in the United Kingdom. More recently, she spent a year in the Netherlands studying and performing works written in early forms of musical notation. Now, back in the United States, Kaylee is excited to build upon her studies abroad with the faculty and students at Northwestern University.

PhD Candidate

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Amanda Ruppenthal Stein

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PhD Candidate

amandastein2012@u.northwestern.edu

Amanda Ruppenthal Stein is a PhD candidate (ABD) in Musicology and is the 2018-19 Crown Graduate Fellow of the Crown Family Center for Jewish and Israel Studies at Northwestern. She holds degrees in music history (thesis: “‘My Own Kaddish:’ Finding a Jewish Voice in Leonard Bernstein’s Symphony No. 3 ‘Kaddish’ and Other Works”) and clarinet performance, both from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and, in 2016, earned a Teaching Certificate through NU’s Searle Center for Advancing Learning & Teaching. Amanda's dissertation (working title: “Sounding Judentum: Assimilation, Art Music, and Being Jewish Musically in 19th Century Germany”) explores how art music served as an avenue of assimilation for 19th century German-speaking Jews and challenges existing scholarly narratives on musical expressions of Judaism and Jewishness by musicians during this period. As a recipient of a Northwestern University Graduate Research Grant, she traveled to Jerusalem and conducted research in the Friedrich Gernsheim archive at the National Library of Israel. She has presented at national and regional conferences including the annual meetings of the American Musicological Society and the Association for Jewish Music. In early 2019, Amanda will be joining members of the Cantors Assembly as part of a solidarity mission and recording project celebrating 100 Years of the Abayudaya Jewish community of Uganda.

4th year PhD

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Vanessa Tonelli

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4th year PhD

VanessaTonelli2020@u.northwestern.edu

Vanessa Tonelli is a PhD Candidate in Musicology, enrolled in Northwestern’s Gender and Sexuality Studies Certificate Program. She received a Bachelor’s in Music Education from New Mexico State University and a Master’s in Musicology with specialization in Gender Studies from Michigan State University. Vanessa’s dissertation traces the interactions among the lives of the female musicians at the Ospedali Grandi, their public performances, and larger social constructions of femininity in late-Baroque Venetian society. In 2017, she conducted preliminary archival research for this project with support from the Social Science Research Council’s Dissertation Prospectus Development Program. Vanessa’s broad interests in the intersections between gender and music originated from her experiences as a trombonist, and she has published an article on the educational experiences and careers of professional female trombonists in the United States. Outside of research, Vanessa plays trombone with Lakeside Pride Music Ensembles and occasionally enjoys swing, blues, and salsa dancing in the Chicago area.

2nd year PhD

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Ben Weissman

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2nd year PhD

BenjaminWeissman2017@u.northwestern.edu

Ben Weissman is a second-year PhD student in musicology. He holds a BA in English from Haverford College (2014) and a MM in musicology from Northwestern University (2017). His research interests include collaboration, experimentation, electronics, and the voice in the 20th and 21st centuries. He has focused on topics including the proliferation of non-Western vocal technique and style in Western art music, identity and embodiment in the contemporary noise music scene, and early synthesizer film music scores. He has presented research on Dick Higgins’s sound poetry intermedia compositions at the Society for American Music. In his spare time, he enjoys drawing, thrifting, singing, and attending concerts in Chicago.

Amanda Ruppenthal Stein

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PhD Candidate

amandastein2012@u.northwestern.edu

Amanda Ruppenthal Stein is a PhD candidate (ABD) in Musicology and is the 2018-19 Crown Graduate Fellow of the Crown Family Center for Jewish and Israel Studies at Northwestern. She holds degrees in music history (thesis: “‘My Own Kaddish:’ Finding a Jewish Voice in Leonard Bernstein’s Symphony No. 3 ‘Kaddish’ and Other Works”) and clarinet performance, both from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and, in 2016, earned a Teaching Certificate through NU’s Searle Center for Advancing Learning & Teaching. Amanda's dissertation (working title: “Sounding Judentum: Assimilation, Art Music, and Being Jewish Musically in 19th Century Germany”) explores how art music served as an avenue of assimilation for 19th century German-speaking Jews and challenges existing scholarly narratives on musical expressions of Judaism and Jewishness by musicians during this period. As a recipient of a Northwestern University Graduate Research Grant, she traveled to Jerusalem and conducted research in the Friedrich Gernsheim archive at the National Library of Israel. She has presented at national and regional conferences including the annual meetings of the American Musicological Society and the Association for Jewish Music. In early 2019, Amanda will be joining members of the Cantors Assembly as part of a solidarity mission and recording project celebrating 100 Years of the Abayudaya Jewish community of Uganda.

Vanessa Tonelli

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4th year PhD

VanessaTonelli2020@u.northwestern.edu

Vanessa Tonelli is a PhD Candidate in Musicology, enrolled in Northwestern’s Gender and Sexuality Studies Certificate Program. She received a Bachelor’s in Music Education from New Mexico State University and a Master’s in Musicology with specialization in Gender Studies from Michigan State University. Vanessa’s dissertation traces the interactions among the lives of the female musicians at the Ospedali Grandi, their public performances, and larger social constructions of femininity in late-Baroque Venetian society. In 2017, she conducted preliminary archival research for this project with support from the Social Science Research Council’s Dissertation Prospectus Development Program. Vanessa’s broad interests in the intersections between gender and music originated from her experiences as a trombonist, and she has published an article on the educational experiences and careers of professional female trombonists in the United States. Outside of research, Vanessa plays trombone with Lakeside Pride Music Ensembles and occasionally enjoys swing, blues, and salsa dancing in the Chicago area.

Ben Weissman

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2nd year PhD

BenjaminWeissman2017@u.northwestern.edu

Ben Weissman is a second-year PhD student in musicology. He holds a BA in English from Haverford College (2014) and a MM in musicology from Northwestern University (2017). His research interests include collaboration, experimentation, electronics, and the voice in the 20th and 21st centuries. He has focused on topics including the proliferation of non-Western vocal technique and style in Western art music, identity and embodiment in the contemporary noise music scene, and early synthesizer film music scores. He has presented research on Dick Higgins’s sound poetry intermedia compositions at the Society for American Music. In his spare time, he enjoys drawing, thrifting, singing, and attending concerts in Chicago.