Encompassing much more than music history, the Musicology Program at Northwestern approaches music as a social activity shaped by aesthetic movements and intellectual theories – in essence, the humanistic study of music in culture.

Students are invited to view music through an interdisciplinary lens to reveal cultural contexts and meanings not accessible through the study of music notation alone. By integrating the perspectives of historical musicology and ethnomusicology, the program trains open-minded yet critical scholars adaptable to varied repertoires and academic strategies, in an atmosphere of collegiality and peer support.

The graduate student support provided to PhD students includes year-round tuition and stipend and fully subsidized health insurance.

About the Musicology Program

The internationally-renowned musicology faculty is the program’s greatest asset.

Their collective expertise covers all periods of traditional music history as well as neglected geographies that are gaining increasing prominence in the field, such as the former Soviet Republics, Spain, Britain, the Middle East, and Latin America. A particular program strength is eighteenth-century studies. All of these areas, coupled with Northwestern’s historic strength in African and African-American studies, create a group of specializations that is unique to Northwestern.

The PhD degree program is truly interdisciplinary in design, requiring coursework in a cognate area in the humanities or social sciences. The musicology coursework reflects the wide interests of the faculty and its interdisciplinary approaches. Students are regular presenters of academic papers at regional, national, and international conferences, and have received prestigious fellowships and awards, as well as academic placements, after graduation.

The Musicology Program is enhanced by its location at a major research university and within a prominent school of music. Because the University is dedicated to interdisciplinary study, the Musicology program gains support from a campus-wide network of scholars who are open to collaboration. A vibrant performance culture includes more than 400 concerts each year. Students also benefit from the multi-faceted scholarly community, research libraries, and thriving musical cultures of both Evanston and Chicago.

Northwestern University Music Library

Among the largest music collections in the U.S., the Northwestern University Music Library has an unmatched strength in 20th century and contemporary classical music, and holds at least one copy of nearly every new score published since 1945.

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Degree Information

Bachelor’s Degrees

The Bachelor of Music degree with concentration in musicology combines broad training in the field of music history with limited performance study. The curriculum provides a balanced exposure to music of all periods and offers studies in the analysis of music, foreign language, ethnomusicology, and related areas.
See Bachelor of Music Requirements

The Bachelor of Arts in Music degree permits a wider selection of liberal arts courses, but less time for musical performance.
See Bachelor of Arts Requirements

The Bachelor of Science in Music degree is a non-admitting degree and is identical to the BA degree with the exception of no foreign language requirement and no senior project requirement.
See Bachelor of Science Requirements

Master of Music

The MM in Musicology is a two-year comprehensive degree that immerses students in all periods of Western music history, world music cultures, and popular/media music.

The Master of Music requires the completion of 18 courses during a residency of two years. The terminal requirement is the public professional presentation of original research completed in the course of study for the degree.
See Master of Music Requirements

PhD in Music

The PhD in Music with musicology specialization exposes students to a variety of musical styles and research methods. Although the program offers advanced degrees only in Western studies, students are encouraged to take courses in ethnomusicology. Admission is selective and the department is small so that students have easy access to the faculty. All students receive full tuition and a living stipend so that they may fully devote themselves to research and study.

The degree requires 18 courses beyond the MM degree, 3 each quarter during the two years of residency. The terminal requirement involves language proficiency in two European languages, a comprehensive examination in music history and theory, and a dissertation.

See PhD Requirements

Musicology PhD Students

4th year PhD

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Sashi Ayyangar

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4th year PhD

SashiAyyangar2025@u.northwestern.edu

Sashi's research focuses on the 18th century, with an emphasis on the music of Bach, Handel, and their contemporaries. He previously studied piano performance at the Guildhall School of Music & Drama, and music at Princeton.

3rd year PhD

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Andrew Barrett

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3rd year PhD

AndrewBarrett2025@u.northwestern.edu

Andrew Barrett is a PhD student in musicology at Northwestern University. He previously earned a BM in guitar from the University of Nebraska-Lincoln and masters’ degrees in guitar and musicology from Indiana University, where he worked as an Associate Instructor in the department of music theory and as an editorial assistant at the Center for the History of Music Theory and Literature. His dissertation explores the intermingling of friendship and politics in United States-Spanish musical networks during the Cold War. Other areas of interest include the reception history of early music and intersections between music and adaptation studies. Andrew is a 2022 participant in Northwestern’s Dissertation Proposal Development Program and the fall 2019 recipient of the AMS Midwest Chapter student paper award.

PhD Candidate

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Olivia Cacchione

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PhD Candidate

OliviaCacchione2021@u.northwestern.edu

Olivia Cacchione holds master's degrees from University of Washington in Music History and Harp Performance. Her work focuses on music, magic, and modernity in England and the United States. Her dissertation examines the role of music in 19th and early 20th century spiritualist séances and its relationship with mediated sound production in the 20th century. With the aid of a fellowship from the Social Science Research Council, she spent the summer of 2018 conducting archival research in England. She also maintains strong interests in British and American popular musics and music in film and television. She has presented her work on country music and advertising at the Society for American Music and the American Musicological Society-Midwest conferences.

2nd year PhD

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Valeria Chavez Roncal

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2nd year PhD

ValeriaChavezRoncal2027@u.northwestern.edu

Valeria Chavez Roncal earned a BM in Violin Performance and a BA in Spanish from Millikin University. Her honors undergraduate thesis, “Creative Process and Reminiscence in Parisian Modernist Ballet,” won the James Millikin Scholars Project of the Year Award. Valeria is pursuing her research interests in ballet music and performance studies as a Musicology Ph.D. student at Northwestern University. Outside of her musicological endeavors, Valeria maintains an active performance career as a violinist. 

Sashi Ayyangar

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4th year PhD

SashiAyyangar2025@u.northwestern.edu

Sashi's research focuses on the 18th century, with an emphasis on the music of Bach, Handel, and their contemporaries. He previously studied piano performance at the Guildhall School of Music & Drama, and music at Princeton.

Andrew Barrett

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3rd year PhD

AndrewBarrett2025@u.northwestern.edu

Andrew Barrett is a PhD student in musicology at Northwestern University. He previously earned a BM in guitar from the University of Nebraska-Lincoln and masters’ degrees in guitar and musicology from Indiana University, where he worked as an Associate Instructor in the department of music theory and as an editorial assistant at the Center for the History of Music Theory and Literature. His dissertation explores the intermingling of friendship and politics in United States-Spanish musical networks during the Cold War. Other areas of interest include the reception history of early music and intersections between music and adaptation studies. Andrew is a 2022 participant in Northwestern’s Dissertation Proposal Development Program and the fall 2019 recipient of the AMS Midwest Chapter student paper award.

Olivia Cacchione

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PhD Candidate

OliviaCacchione2021@u.northwestern.edu

Olivia Cacchione holds master's degrees from University of Washington in Music History and Harp Performance. Her work focuses on music, magic, and modernity in England and the United States. Her dissertation examines the role of music in 19th and early 20th century spiritualist séances and its relationship with mediated sound production in the 20th century. With the aid of a fellowship from the Social Science Research Council, she spent the summer of 2018 conducting archival research in England. She also maintains strong interests in British and American popular musics and music in film and television. She has presented her work on country music and advertising at the Society for American Music and the American Musicological Society-Midwest conferences.

Valeria Chavez Roncal

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2nd year PhD

ValeriaChavezRoncal2027@u.northwestern.edu

Valeria Chavez Roncal earned a BM in Violin Performance and a BA in Spanish from Millikin University. Her honors undergraduate thesis, “Creative Process and Reminiscence in Parisian Modernist Ballet,” won the James Millikin Scholars Project of the Year Award. Valeria is pursuing her research interests in ballet music and performance studies as a Musicology Ph.D. student at Northwestern University. Outside of her musicological endeavors, Valeria maintains an active performance career as a violinist. 

4th year PhD

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Paul Feller

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4th year PhD

PaulFellerGumucio2024@u.northwestern.edu

Paul Feller holds a Bachelor of Arts degree in Musicology from the Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile (PUC). He is currently a musicology Ph.D. student and enrolled in Northwestern’s Medieval Studies Certificate Program. Paul’s research interests include early-modern music in the Spanish colonies, musical depictions of Otherness, and intersections of music with natural philosophy. His research focuses on the musical representation of imagined soundscapes in Europe and the religious use of compositional devices in early-modern Latin-American sacred music. Paul has presented on the Latin-American villancico at international conferences in the USA, Spain, and Mexico. His research on the catechetical use of the Christmas villancico in eighteenth-century Chile will be published in 2021.

3rd year PhD

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Mick Lim

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3rd year PhD

BingLim2026@u.northwestern.edu

Lim Bing Nan, Mick is a PhD student in musicology. He studied at Yong Siew Toh Conservatory of Music and Peabody Institute from 2014-2018, earning a joint B.Mus. (Hons.) in composition with a second major in European Studies and minor in Musicology. From 2018-2020, he studied at Hanover University of Music, Drama and Media, where he is expected to earn a M.A. in Music Research and Music Education with minors in Philosophy of Science and Music and Gender. His core research interests revolve around the German-speaking lands in the 18th century. His master’s thesis examined the reception of French classical tragedy in the court opera of Frederick II. He remains interested in music of the 20th and 21st century from his undergraduate training as a composer.

PhD Candidate

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Brooke Little

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PhD Candidate

Q4A4T6@u.northwestern.edu

Brooke Little holds a BM in Voice Performance (2005) and also an MME in Vocal Music Education (2008) both from the University of Missouri-Columbia. After which time she spent seven years teaching choir and general music in Kansas City, in primarily urban settings. She also holds a MM in Musicology from the University of Missouri- Kansas City (2017). Her thesis "The Musical Education and Involvement of the Six Wives of Henry VIII", focuses on questions of gender, sexuality, female education and performance in the first half of the English sixteenth century. She has presented selections from her work at the Sixteenth Century Society conference. When not studying, she enjoys spending time with her husband and cats.

PhD Candidate

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Emily Masincup

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PhD Candidate

EmilyMasincup2022@u.northwestern.edu

Emily Masincup received her BM in Music Performance from Messiah College, PA (2014), and her MA in Music from Cardiff University, Wales (2016). Her master’s thesis, entitled “Rings and Other Gendered Spaces: Musical Representations of Gender in Peter Jackson’s The Lord of the Rings Films,” seeks to establish unique connections between Howard Shore’s score and different types of space present within the films—literal and/or metaphorical—in order to illuminate subversive readings of gender. She maintains a strong interest in film music, and is especially thrilled when her explorations of film sound lead her into the territory of media studies. Emily also researches historical and contemporary conceptualizations of the human voice/vocality and hopes to combine this research with her film interests by examining representations of musical vocality within film. When she is not studying, she enjoys working on Kakuro puzzles, snuggling with cats, and singing with Northwestern’s University Chorale.

Paul Feller

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4th year PhD

PaulFellerGumucio2024@u.northwestern.edu

Paul Feller holds a Bachelor of Arts degree in Musicology from the Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile (PUC). He is currently a musicology Ph.D. student and enrolled in Northwestern’s Medieval Studies Certificate Program. Paul’s research interests include early-modern music in the Spanish colonies, musical depictions of Otherness, and intersections of music with natural philosophy. His research focuses on the musical representation of imagined soundscapes in Europe and the religious use of compositional devices in early-modern Latin-American sacred music. Paul has presented on the Latin-American villancico at international conferences in the USA, Spain, and Mexico. His research on the catechetical use of the Christmas villancico in eighteenth-century Chile will be published in 2021.

Mick Lim

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3rd year PhD

BingLim2026@u.northwestern.edu

Lim Bing Nan, Mick is a PhD student in musicology. He studied at Yong Siew Toh Conservatory of Music and Peabody Institute from 2014-2018, earning a joint B.Mus. (Hons.) in composition with a second major in European Studies and minor in Musicology. From 2018-2020, he studied at Hanover University of Music, Drama and Media, where he is expected to earn a M.A. in Music Research and Music Education with minors in Philosophy of Science and Music and Gender. His core research interests revolve around the German-speaking lands in the 18th century. His master’s thesis examined the reception of French classical tragedy in the court opera of Frederick II. He remains interested in music of the 20th and 21st century from his undergraduate training as a composer.

Brooke Little

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PhD Candidate

Q4A4T6@u.northwestern.edu

Brooke Little holds a BM in Voice Performance (2005) and also an MME in Vocal Music Education (2008) both from the University of Missouri-Columbia. After which time she spent seven years teaching choir and general music in Kansas City, in primarily urban settings. She also holds a MM in Musicology from the University of Missouri- Kansas City (2017). Her thesis "The Musical Education and Involvement of the Six Wives of Henry VIII", focuses on questions of gender, sexuality, female education and performance in the first half of the English sixteenth century. She has presented selections from her work at the Sixteenth Century Society conference. When not studying, she enjoys spending time with her husband and cats.

Emily Masincup

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PhD Candidate

EmilyMasincup2022@u.northwestern.edu

Emily Masincup received her BM in Music Performance from Messiah College, PA (2014), and her MA in Music from Cardiff University, Wales (2016). Her master’s thesis, entitled “Rings and Other Gendered Spaces: Musical Representations of Gender in Peter Jackson’s The Lord of the Rings Films,” seeks to establish unique connections between Howard Shore’s score and different types of space present within the films—literal and/or metaphorical—in order to illuminate subversive readings of gender. She maintains a strong interest in film music, and is especially thrilled when her explorations of film sound lead her into the territory of media studies. Emily also researches historical and contemporary conceptualizations of the human voice/vocality and hopes to combine this research with her film interests by examining representations of musical vocality within film. When she is not studying, she enjoys working on Kakuro puzzles, snuggling with cats, and singing with Northwestern’s University Chorale.

PhD Candidate

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Simon Nugent

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PhD Candidate

SimonNugent2022@u.northwestern.edu

Simon Nugent earned a Bachelor of Music and Master of Musicology degrees from University College Dublin (UCD). Simon’s research interests include music and audiovisual media, medieval music, and Celtic music. In 2016, he co-organised a meeting of the International Musicological Society’s medieval music study group, Cantus Planus, co-sponsored by UCD and the University of Notre Dame. In the same year, he was co-editor of Issue 9 of The Musicology Review, a peer-reviewed postgraduate publication based at UCD. His transcription of the divine office of Saint Malachy will be published in 2019, and his research on Celtic music as medieval music in Hollywood cinema was published as part of an edited volume entitled Recomposing the Past: Early Music on Stage and Screen, by Routledge press in early 2018. Simon has presented at conferences throughout Ireland and the UK, including the Royal Musical Association Research Students’ Conference and Society for Musicology in Ireland’s postgraduate and annual plenary conferences.

PhD Candidate

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Nathan Reeves

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PhD Candidate

NathanReeves2020@u.northwestern.edu

Nathan is a PhD candidate in musicology with a cognate focus in anthropology. He holds a BM in Vocal Performance from Furman University and a MM in Musicology from the University of Tennessee, Knoxville with a concentration in medieval and renaissance studies. Nathan’s primary research focuses on musical life of the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries in Spanish-occupied southern Italy. His dissertation project examines how musical representations of subaltern populations intersected with the production of urban space in the city of Naples. This work is particularly attuned to state practices of spatial and sonic regulation that developed under Spanish colonialism. Nathan pursues complementary research in the history of ethnomusicology, particularly concerning approaches to sound recording and transcription. Additional interests include sound studies, Indigenous studies, gender and sexuality studies, postcolonial theory, and ethnography. Nathan has presented his research at a number of conferences, including meetings of the American Musicological Society, the Society for Ethnomusicology, the Sixteenth Century Society, Binghamton University’s Center for Medieval and Renaissance Studies, and at events hosted by the Newberry Library of Chicago. He currently serves as Co-Coordinator for Northwestern’s Early Modern Colloquium. In addition to his scholarly pursuits, he remains an avid singer in ensembles of the Chicago area.

2nd year PhD

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Kristian Rodriguez

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2nd year PhD

KristianRodriguez2025@u.northwestern.edu

Kristian Rodriguez (they/them) is a PhD student in musicology in the Bienen School of Music, as well as a Mellon Cluster Fellow in the Gender and Sexuality Studies program at Northwestern. They hold a BA in Music from Texas State University (2016), as well as an MM in Composition from Arizona State University (2019), where they completed and staged a performance of their thesis work, Sueño-Vibrant: A Secular Cantata for SATB Chorus and Soloists with Electric Guitars. Kristian’s research focuses primarily on three major areas: alternative and indie rock since 1970; vocal music and staged works since 1950; and Mexican and Mexican-American music since the Mexican Revolution. Because of their own background as a queer, mestize scholar from a working-class background, Kristian has a personal interest in the scholarship of musical traditions as they relate to race, class, gender, sexuality, and the formation of individual and communal identities. They also explore how musical traditions interact with other artistic traditions and fields of study. In addition to their research, Kristian is an active composer, songwriter, vocalist, and performer.

PhD Candidate

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Milena Schaller

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PhD Candidate

milena.schaller@northwestern.edu

Milena Schaller is a PhD candidate in Musicology with a certificate in the Slavic Languages and Literature department. They got their academic start as a Cello and French major at UC Davis in California, and hold a Masters in Musicology from Washington University in St. Louis. Their dissertation, heavily based on reception and the idea of connected networks, focuses on the Ballet Russe in London of the 1920s and its connections to puppetry, homophobic press, and the folk revival in England. Previous research explored the influence of the Franco-Russian alliance on the early set design and choreographic choices of the Ballet Russe. They have presented on this topic at the Annual Conference of the Francophone Music Criticism Network in Paris, and at the conference on Artistic Migration and Identity in Paris in Montréal; their chapter on this subject was recently published in the book Migration artistique et identité: Paris, 1870-1950.

They also study ideas of heritage, culture, and the mythic past in Folk Metal bands of the 2000s; they have presented on folk metal at the Midwest Graduate Music Consortium, the International Conference on Music Since 1900 held in Glasgow, Scotland, and the Analytical Approaches to World Music conference. Their chapter on literary references and rhetorical devices in Turisas's album The Varangian Way was recently accepted as a chapter in a future book project entitled Progressive Rock, Metal, and the Literary Imagination. They live in Lyon, France, where they can be found walking their dog in the nearby forest or desperately looking for actually spicy peppers to cook some real Californian Mexican food

Simon Nugent

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PhD Candidate

SimonNugent2022@u.northwestern.edu

Simon Nugent earned a Bachelor of Music and Master of Musicology degrees from University College Dublin (UCD). Simon’s research interests include music and audiovisual media, medieval music, and Celtic music. In 2016, he co-organised a meeting of the International Musicological Society’s medieval music study group, Cantus Planus, co-sponsored by UCD and the University of Notre Dame. In the same year, he was co-editor of Issue 9 of The Musicology Review, a peer-reviewed postgraduate publication based at UCD. His transcription of the divine office of Saint Malachy will be published in 2019, and his research on Celtic music as medieval music in Hollywood cinema was published as part of an edited volume entitled Recomposing the Past: Early Music on Stage and Screen, by Routledge press in early 2018. Simon has presented at conferences throughout Ireland and the UK, including the Royal Musical Association Research Students’ Conference and Society for Musicology in Ireland’s postgraduate and annual plenary conferences.

Nathan Reeves

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PhD Candidate

NathanReeves2020@u.northwestern.edu

Nathan is a PhD candidate in musicology with a cognate focus in anthropology. He holds a BM in Vocal Performance from Furman University and a MM in Musicology from the University of Tennessee, Knoxville with a concentration in medieval and renaissance studies. Nathan’s primary research focuses on musical life of the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries in Spanish-occupied southern Italy. His dissertation project examines how musical representations of subaltern populations intersected with the production of urban space in the city of Naples. This work is particularly attuned to state practices of spatial and sonic regulation that developed under Spanish colonialism. Nathan pursues complementary research in the history of ethnomusicology, particularly concerning approaches to sound recording and transcription. Additional interests include sound studies, Indigenous studies, gender and sexuality studies, postcolonial theory, and ethnography. Nathan has presented his research at a number of conferences, including meetings of the American Musicological Society, the Society for Ethnomusicology, the Sixteenth Century Society, Binghamton University’s Center for Medieval and Renaissance Studies, and at events hosted by the Newberry Library of Chicago. He currently serves as Co-Coordinator for Northwestern’s Early Modern Colloquium. In addition to his scholarly pursuits, he remains an avid singer in ensembles of the Chicago area.

Kristian Rodriguez

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2nd year PhD

KristianRodriguez2025@u.northwestern.edu

Kristian Rodriguez (they/them) is a PhD student in musicology in the Bienen School of Music, as well as a Mellon Cluster Fellow in the Gender and Sexuality Studies program at Northwestern. They hold a BA in Music from Texas State University (2016), as well as an MM in Composition from Arizona State University (2019), where they completed and staged a performance of their thesis work, Sueño-Vibrant: A Secular Cantata for SATB Chorus and Soloists with Electric Guitars. Kristian’s research focuses primarily on three major areas: alternative and indie rock since 1970; vocal music and staged works since 1950; and Mexican and Mexican-American music since the Mexican Revolution. Because of their own background as a queer, mestize scholar from a working-class background, Kristian has a personal interest in the scholarship of musical traditions as they relate to race, class, gender, sexuality, and the formation of individual and communal identities. They also explore how musical traditions interact with other artistic traditions and fields of study. In addition to their research, Kristian is an active composer, songwriter, vocalist, and performer.

Milena Schaller

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PhD Candidate

milena.schaller@northwestern.edu

Milena Schaller is a PhD candidate in Musicology with a certificate in the Slavic Languages and Literature department. They got their academic start as a Cello and French major at UC Davis in California, and hold a Masters in Musicology from Washington University in St. Louis. Their dissertation, heavily based on reception and the idea of connected networks, focuses on the Ballet Russe in London of the 1920s and its connections to puppetry, homophobic press, and the folk revival in England. Previous research explored the influence of the Franco-Russian alliance on the early set design and choreographic choices of the Ballet Russe. They have presented on this topic at the Annual Conference of the Francophone Music Criticism Network in Paris, and at the conference on Artistic Migration and Identity in Paris in Montréal; their chapter on this subject was recently published in the book Migration artistique et identité: Paris, 1870-1950.

They also study ideas of heritage, culture, and the mythic past in Folk Metal bands of the 2000s; they have presented on folk metal at the Midwest Graduate Music Consortium, the International Conference on Music Since 1900 held in Glasgow, Scotland, and the Analytical Approaches to World Music conference. Their chapter on literary references and rhetorical devices in Turisas's album The Varangian Way was recently accepted as a chapter in a future book project entitled Progressive Rock, Metal, and the Literary Imagination. They live in Lyon, France, where they can be found walking their dog in the nearby forest or desperately looking for actually spicy peppers to cook some real Californian Mexican food

2nd year PhD

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Vivian Teresa Tompkins

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2nd year PhD

VivianTompkins2027@u.northwestern.edu

Vivian Teresa Tompkins is a PhD student in musicology at the Bienen School of Music and a Mellon Cluster Fellow in Northwestern’s Gender and Sexuality Studies program. She holds a BA in Music from Furman University (2017), an MSt in Music (Musicology) from the University of Oxford (2018), and a MS in Library and Information Science from Syracuse University (2021). Her research focuses on women’s music-making in late seventeenth- and early eighteenth-century England, particularly their performance of devotional music in domestic contexts. She is also interested in pursuing work at the intersection of musicology, library science, and the digital humanities in order to build more inclusive and accessible resources for music research. Outside of her studies, she enjoys singing, journaling, and spending time outdoors.

PhD Candidate

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Ben Weissman

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PhD Candidate

BenjaminWeissman2017@u.northwestern.edu

Ben Weissman holds a BA in English from Haverford College (2014) and a MM in musicology from Northwestern University (2017). His research interests include collaboration, experimentation, electronics, and the voice in the 20th and 21st centuries. He has focused on topics including the proliferation of non-Western vocal technique and style in Western art music, identity and embodiment in the contemporary noise music scene, and early synthesizer film music scores. He has presented research on Dick Higgins’s sound poetry intermedia compositions at the Society for American Music. In his spare time, he enjoys drawing, thrifting, singing, and attending concerts in Chicago.

Vivian Teresa Tompkins

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2nd year PhD

VivianTompkins2027@u.northwestern.edu

Vivian Teresa Tompkins is a PhD student in musicology at the Bienen School of Music and a Mellon Cluster Fellow in Northwestern’s Gender and Sexuality Studies program. She holds a BA in Music from Furman University (2017), an MSt in Music (Musicology) from the University of Oxford (2018), and a MS in Library and Information Science from Syracuse University (2021). Her research focuses on women’s music-making in late seventeenth- and early eighteenth-century England, particularly their performance of devotional music in domestic contexts. She is also interested in pursuing work at the intersection of musicology, library science, and the digital humanities in order to build more inclusive and accessible resources for music research. Outside of her studies, she enjoys singing, journaling, and spending time outdoors.

Ben Weissman

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PhD Candidate

BenjaminWeissman2017@u.northwestern.edu

Ben Weissman holds a BA in English from Haverford College (2014) and a MM in musicology from Northwestern University (2017). His research interests include collaboration, experimentation, electronics, and the voice in the 20th and 21st centuries. He has focused on topics including the proliferation of non-Western vocal technique and style in Western art music, identity and embodiment in the contemporary noise music scene, and early synthesizer film music scores. He has presented research on Dick Higgins’s sound poetry intermedia compositions at the Society for American Music. In his spare time, he enjoys drawing, thrifting, singing, and attending concerts in Chicago.