Bienen Ensembles

Virtual Panel Discussion on L'Orfeo

Friday, May 22, 2020 at 3:30pm

Online Event

This event is part of the Dunbar Early Music Festival.

A Zoom discussion of Claudio Monteverdi's opera L'Orfeo, now a Northwestern University Opera Theater project in progress entitled Orfeo Remote.

Initial conceptual presentations will be followed by discussion. Discussion topics include:
 • The role of Eurydice
 • Psychoanalytical approaches to the opera
 • Behind-the-scenes process of the video creation

Any remaining time will be devoted to questions from the virtual audience.

Please register via the button below to be emailed a Zoom link to the virtual panel discussion:
Register


Panelists

Moderator

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Drew Edward Davies

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Moderator

Chair, Department of Music Studies, and Associate Professor, Musicology, Bienen School of Music.

Drew Edward Davies is a specialist in 17th- and 18th-century music in Latin America, Iberia, and the wider European context, with complementary research interests in colonialism, contemporary architecture, and a diversity of musical genres and practices.

Professor Davies creates academic scholarship, editions and catalogs of primary sources, and frequently collaborates with performing groups such as the Chicago Arts Orchestra to revive and better understand repertoires of early modern music. His critical editions of music from 18th-century Mexico, Manuel de Sumaya: Villancicos from Mexico City and Santiago Billoni: Complete Works, are available from A-R Editions. His thematic catalog of the music archive at Durango Cathedral, Mexico, is published by the press of the Instituto de Investigaciones Estéticas at the Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México.

His articles and reviews appear in journals such as Early Music, Eighteenth-Century MusicSanctorumRevista Portuguesa de MusicologiaJournal of the Society for American MusicJournal of the American Musicological Society, Heterofonía, and Boletín Música (Havana), as well as in numerous essay collections. In 2011, the journal Early Music awarded his article “Villancicos for the Virgin of Guadalupe from Mexico City” with the inaugural J. M. Thomson prize, and the Society for American Music recognized his PhD dissertation, “The Italianized Frontier: Music at Durango Cathedral, Español Culture, and the Aesthetics of Devotion in Eighteenth-Century New Spain, with the 2006 Wiley Housewright Award. Formerly a bassoonist, his courses at Northwestern range from colonial Latin American topics to Beethoven, Romani music, and opera performance.

Professor Davies is also Academic Coordinator of the Mexico City-based “Musicat” project, the Seminario de Música en la Nueva España y el México Independiente (Seminar on the Music of New Spain and Independent Mexico). He is active in the American Musicological Society, Society for American Music, the Society for Seventeenth-Century Music, and the Society for Eighteenth-Century Music and has presented at academic conferences and early music festivals throughout the USA, and in Mexico, Canada, the UK, the Netherlands, Germany, Spain, Italy, Ukraine, Cuba, Poland, and Japan.

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Stephen Alltop

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Senior Lecturer, Conducting and Ensembles, Bienen School of Music. Conductor, Orfeo Remote.

A conductor, harpsichordist, and organist, Stephen Alltop is director of music for Alice Millar Chapel, conductor of the Baroque Music Ensemble, and an instructor in conducting, harpsichord, and oratorio. A specialist in oratorio performance, he has conducted over 100 oratorio and operatic masterworks. He also serves as music director for the Apollo Chorus of Chicago, the Green Lake Choral Institute, and the Elmhurst Symphony Orchestra. Under his direction, the Apollo Chorus has expanded its collaborations to include appearances with the Chicago Symphony Orchestra, Chicago Opera Theater, London Symphony Orchestra, Ravinia Festival, Peninsula Music Festival, Josh Groban on Tour,  and The Oprah Winfrey Show.

In 2012, he was named Conductor of the Year by the Illinois Council of Orchestras for his work with the Elmhurst Symphony Orchestra. The orchestra has received multiple awards for excellence in programming. He has also been named to Northwestern’s Faculty Honor Roll. Dr. Alltop became the music director and conductor of the Champaign-Urbana Symphony Orchestra commencing with the 2013-14 season. He has guest-conducted numerous choruses and orchestras across the United States. He has led opera and orchestral concerts with a number of Italian orchestras, including I Soloisti di Perugia, Fondazione Arturo Toscanini (Bologna), Teatro Reggio Orchestra (Parma), Festival Mozart (Roverto), Orchestra Sinfonica della Provincia di Bari, Teatro Piccinni (Bari), and the Festival Duni (Matera). In February 2013, he was a guest conductor for the International School Choral Music Society in Busan, South Korea.

Dr. Alltop has worked closely with leading composers of the day, including residency projects with John Corigliano, Eleanor Daley, Stephen Paulus, and Eric Whitacre. He has conducted world premieres of works by John Luther Adams, Jan Bach, Frank Ferko, Stephen Paulus, Alan Terricciano, Janika Vandervelde, and many others. In 2007, he made his Carnegie Hall debut conducting music of Eric Whitacre.

An active musician in historic performance practices, Stephen Alltop has performed with many of today’s outstanding early music musicians, including Julianne Baird, Elizabeth Blumenstock, David Douglass, Ellen Hargis, Ingrid Matthews, Kenneth Slowik and Ton Koopman. He has performed as a harpsichordist and organist with Boston's Handel and Haydn Orchestra, Chicago Symphony Orchestra, Chicago Bach Project, Lyric Opera of Chicago, Milwaukee Symphony Orchestra, Minnesota Orchestra, Music of the Baroque, and the Omaha Symphony. Dr. Alltop has served as principal organist for Soli Deo Gloria’s Chicago Bach Project. In 2011, he was principal organist performing Bach’s St. Matthew Passion with the Ensemble Orchestral de Paris and conductor John Nelson at the Basilique St. Denis in France. As conductor of the Annual Celebration of Celtic Music at Chicago’s Symphony Center, he has worked with distinguished television and stage performers such as Brian Dennehy, Bill Kurtis, John Mahoney, and Martin Sheen. Dr. Alltop served as coordinator for WFMT's Chicago Bach Organ Project, a live performance series of all of Johann Sebastian Bach's organ works. His performances have been broadcast on Medici TV, RAI Italian Radio and Television, and the WFMT Fine Arts Network. His recordings can be found on the Albany, Cedille, Clarion, and American Gramaphone labels.

In demand as a speaker about music, Dr. Alltop lectures frequently for the Chicago Symphony Orchestra, the Northwestern University Alumnae Continuing Education Series, and other musical organizations. In 2014-15, he gave presentations on leadership for the Advanced Management program of the Kellogg School of Management. He is represented by Joanne Rile Artist Management.

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Linda Austern

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Associate Professor, Musicology, Bienen School of Music.

Linda Phyllis Austern is a specialist in Western European, and especially English, music of the sixteenth, seventeenth, and early eighteenth centuries. Her expertise includes the intersections between music and the visual arts, gender and sexuality, natural philosophy, and the Shakespearean theater. Her monographs include Both from the Ears and Mind: Thinking About Music in Early Modern England (2020) and Music in English Children's Drama of the Later Renaissance (1994). She has edited Music, Sensation, and Sensuality (2002), and co-edited Beyond Boundaries: Re-Thinking Music Circulation in Early Modern England (2017); Psalms in the Early Modern World (2011); and Music of the Sirens (with Inna Naroditskaya 2006).

Professor Austern recently published "Manipulating Music at the Court of Elizabeth I" in the Journal of the Royal Musical Association (2017) and contributed chapters to The Noble Flame of Katherine Philips (Duquesne University Press, 2015); Eroticism in Early Modern Music (Ashgate, 2015); and Shakespeare, Music and Performance (Cambridge, 2017). Her other articles and reviews have appeared in collections of scholarly essays and such journals as the Journal of the American Musicological Society, the Journal of Musicological ResearchThe Journal of MusicologyMusic and LettersModern PhilologyThe Musical Quarterly, and Renaissance Quarterly. Her research has been funded by the American Council of Learned Societies, British Academy, Newberry Library, The Mary Ingraham Bunting Institute of Radcliffe College (Harvard University), and National Endowment for the Humanities. She is presently finishing a monograph entitled Gendering Music in Early Modern England.

Professor Austern recently completed a term as vice-president of the North American British Music Studies Association. She also serves as Musical Advisor for the forthcoming Oxford University Press Complete Works of John Marston, is a member of the Advisory Committee for Seventeenth-Century Music for Grove Music Online/Oxford Music Online, and has previously served on the editorial boards of the Journal of the American Musicological SocietyJournal of Seventeenth-Century Music, and Renaissance Quarterly.

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Jeffrey Kurtzman

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Professor of Musicology, Washington University, St. Louis

Jeffrey Kurtzman earned his Ph.D. in musicology from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. He was one of the founding faculty of the Shepherd School of Music at Rice University, and is Professor of Music at Washington University in St. Louis. A specialist in 16th and 17th-century Italian music, he has published books, articles, and editions on Claudio Monteverdi and other Italian composers from the same period. He was founder of the international ‘Society for Seventeenth-Century Music’, has served as the Reviews Editor of the Society's Journal, and is a member of the Editorial Boards of the Journal and the Society’s Web Library of Seventeenth-Century Music. Prof. Kurtzman's research has been supported by the Martha Baird Rockefeller Foundation, the John Simon Guggenheim Foundation, the National Endowment for the Humanities, the American Council of Learned Societies, and the Deutscher Akademischer Austaushdienst, as well as grants from Middlebury College, Rice University, Washington University, and the University of Venice.

Drew Edward Davies

Close

Moderator

Chair, Department of Music Studies, and Associate Professor, Musicology, Bienen School of Music.

Drew Edward Davies is a specialist in 17th- and 18th-century music in Latin America, Iberia, and the wider European context, with complementary research interests in colonialism, contemporary architecture, and a diversity of musical genres and practices.

Professor Davies creates academic scholarship, editions and catalogs of primary sources, and frequently collaborates with performing groups such as the Chicago Arts Orchestra to revive and better understand repertoires of early modern music. His critical editions of music from 18th-century Mexico, Manuel de Sumaya: Villancicos from Mexico City and Santiago Billoni: Complete Works, are available from A-R Editions. His thematic catalog of the music archive at Durango Cathedral, Mexico, is published by the press of the Instituto de Investigaciones Estéticas at the Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México.

His articles and reviews appear in journals such as Early Music, Eighteenth-Century MusicSanctorumRevista Portuguesa de MusicologiaJournal of the Society for American MusicJournal of the American Musicological Society, Heterofonía, and Boletín Música (Havana), as well as in numerous essay collections. In 2011, the journal Early Music awarded his article “Villancicos for the Virgin of Guadalupe from Mexico City” with the inaugural J. M. Thomson prize, and the Society for American Music recognized his PhD dissertation, “The Italianized Frontier: Music at Durango Cathedral, Español Culture, and the Aesthetics of Devotion in Eighteenth-Century New Spain, with the 2006 Wiley Housewright Award. Formerly a bassoonist, his courses at Northwestern range from colonial Latin American topics to Beethoven, Romani music, and opera performance.

Professor Davies is also Academic Coordinator of the Mexico City-based “Musicat” project, the Seminario de Música en la Nueva España y el México Independiente (Seminar on the Music of New Spain and Independent Mexico). He is active in the American Musicological Society, Society for American Music, the Society for Seventeenth-Century Music, and the Society for Eighteenth-Century Music and has presented at academic conferences and early music festivals throughout the USA, and in Mexico, Canada, the UK, the Netherlands, Germany, Spain, Italy, Ukraine, Cuba, Poland, and Japan.

Stephen Alltop

Close

Senior Lecturer, Conducting and Ensembles, Bienen School of Music. Conductor, Orfeo Remote.

A conductor, harpsichordist, and organist, Stephen Alltop is director of music for Alice Millar Chapel, conductor of the Baroque Music Ensemble, and an instructor in conducting, harpsichord, and oratorio. A specialist in oratorio performance, he has conducted over 100 oratorio and operatic masterworks. He also serves as music director for the Apollo Chorus of Chicago, the Green Lake Choral Institute, and the Elmhurst Symphony Orchestra. Under his direction, the Apollo Chorus has expanded its collaborations to include appearances with the Chicago Symphony Orchestra, Chicago Opera Theater, London Symphony Orchestra, Ravinia Festival, Peninsula Music Festival, Josh Groban on Tour,  and The Oprah Winfrey Show.

In 2012, he was named Conductor of the Year by the Illinois Council of Orchestras for his work with the Elmhurst Symphony Orchestra. The orchestra has received multiple awards for excellence in programming. He has also been named to Northwestern’s Faculty Honor Roll. Dr. Alltop became the music director and conductor of the Champaign-Urbana Symphony Orchestra commencing with the 2013-14 season. He has guest-conducted numerous choruses and orchestras across the United States. He has led opera and orchestral concerts with a number of Italian orchestras, including I Soloisti di Perugia, Fondazione Arturo Toscanini (Bologna), Teatro Reggio Orchestra (Parma), Festival Mozart (Roverto), Orchestra Sinfonica della Provincia di Bari, Teatro Piccinni (Bari), and the Festival Duni (Matera). In February 2013, he was a guest conductor for the International School Choral Music Society in Busan, South Korea.

Dr. Alltop has worked closely with leading composers of the day, including residency projects with John Corigliano, Eleanor Daley, Stephen Paulus, and Eric Whitacre. He has conducted world premieres of works by John Luther Adams, Jan Bach, Frank Ferko, Stephen Paulus, Alan Terricciano, Janika Vandervelde, and many others. In 2007, he made his Carnegie Hall debut conducting music of Eric Whitacre.

An active musician in historic performance practices, Stephen Alltop has performed with many of today’s outstanding early music musicians, including Julianne Baird, Elizabeth Blumenstock, David Douglass, Ellen Hargis, Ingrid Matthews, Kenneth Slowik and Ton Koopman. He has performed as a harpsichordist and organist with Boston's Handel and Haydn Orchestra, Chicago Symphony Orchestra, Chicago Bach Project, Lyric Opera of Chicago, Milwaukee Symphony Orchestra, Minnesota Orchestra, Music of the Baroque, and the Omaha Symphony. Dr. Alltop has served as principal organist for Soli Deo Gloria’s Chicago Bach Project. In 2011, he was principal organist performing Bach’s St. Matthew Passion with the Ensemble Orchestral de Paris and conductor John Nelson at the Basilique St. Denis in France. As conductor of the Annual Celebration of Celtic Music at Chicago’s Symphony Center, he has worked with distinguished television and stage performers such as Brian Dennehy, Bill Kurtis, John Mahoney, and Martin Sheen. Dr. Alltop served as coordinator for WFMT's Chicago Bach Organ Project, a live performance series of all of Johann Sebastian Bach's organ works. His performances have been broadcast on Medici TV, RAI Italian Radio and Television, and the WFMT Fine Arts Network. His recordings can be found on the Albany, Cedille, Clarion, and American Gramaphone labels.

In demand as a speaker about music, Dr. Alltop lectures frequently for the Chicago Symphony Orchestra, the Northwestern University Alumnae Continuing Education Series, and other musical organizations. In 2014-15, he gave presentations on leadership for the Advanced Management program of the Kellogg School of Management. He is represented by Joanne Rile Artist Management.

Linda Austern

Close

Associate Professor, Musicology, Bienen School of Music.

Linda Phyllis Austern is a specialist in Western European, and especially English, music of the sixteenth, seventeenth, and early eighteenth centuries. Her expertise includes the intersections between music and the visual arts, gender and sexuality, natural philosophy, and the Shakespearean theater. Her monographs include Both from the Ears and Mind: Thinking About Music in Early Modern England (2020) and Music in English Children's Drama of the Later Renaissance (1994). She has edited Music, Sensation, and Sensuality (2002), and co-edited Beyond Boundaries: Re-Thinking Music Circulation in Early Modern England (2017); Psalms in the Early Modern World (2011); and Music of the Sirens (with Inna Naroditskaya 2006).

Professor Austern recently published "Manipulating Music at the Court of Elizabeth I" in the Journal of the Royal Musical Association (2017) and contributed chapters to The Noble Flame of Katherine Philips (Duquesne University Press, 2015); Eroticism in Early Modern Music (Ashgate, 2015); and Shakespeare, Music and Performance (Cambridge, 2017). Her other articles and reviews have appeared in collections of scholarly essays and such journals as the Journal of the American Musicological Society, the Journal of Musicological ResearchThe Journal of MusicologyMusic and LettersModern PhilologyThe Musical Quarterly, and Renaissance Quarterly. Her research has been funded by the American Council of Learned Societies, British Academy, Newberry Library, The Mary Ingraham Bunting Institute of Radcliffe College (Harvard University), and National Endowment for the Humanities. She is presently finishing a monograph entitled Gendering Music in Early Modern England.

Professor Austern recently completed a term as vice-president of the North American British Music Studies Association. She also serves as Musical Advisor for the forthcoming Oxford University Press Complete Works of John Marston, is a member of the Advisory Committee for Seventeenth-Century Music for Grove Music Online/Oxford Music Online, and has previously served on the editorial boards of the Journal of the American Musicological SocietyJournal of Seventeenth-Century Music, and Renaissance Quarterly.

Jeffrey Kurtzman

Close

Professor of Musicology, Washington University, St. Louis

Jeffrey Kurtzman earned his Ph.D. in musicology from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. He was one of the founding faculty of the Shepherd School of Music at Rice University, and is Professor of Music at Washington University in St. Louis. A specialist in 16th and 17th-century Italian music, he has published books, articles, and editions on Claudio Monteverdi and other Italian composers from the same period. He was founder of the international ‘Society for Seventeenth-Century Music’, has served as the Reviews Editor of the Society's Journal, and is a member of the Editorial Boards of the Journal and the Society’s Web Library of Seventeenth-Century Music. Prof. Kurtzman's research has been supported by the Martha Baird Rockefeller Foundation, the John Simon Guggenheim Foundation, the National Endowment for the Humanities, the American Council of Learned Societies, and the Deutscher Akademischer Austaushdienst, as well as grants from Middlebury College, Rice University, Washington University, and the University of Venice.

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Jason Rosenholtz-Witt

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PhD Candidate, Musicology, Bienen School of Music

Jason Rosenholtz-Witt is a PhD candidate in the musicology program and a Northwestern Presidential Fellow. His dissertation, "Musical Networks on the Borders of the Venetian Republic, 1580–1630," examines the mediation and circulation of music through social and professional networks with an emphasis on Bergamo, a thriving musical center during this period. By documenting the movement of both physical musical objects and ephemeral ideas, Jason’s research reveals a complex and international network of musicians, composers, artists, scribes, patrons, religious figures, and diplomats engaged in musical production. He earned a Bachelor’s in double bass performance from the University of Northern Colorado (2005), and a Master’s in performance from Colorado State University (2011). Between degrees, Jason spent four years teaching English in Hiroshima, Japan. He has published on seventeenth-century music in The Viol and Early Music Performer. Jason maintains a secondary interest in twentieth-century experimentalism and contributed a chapter in A Feast of Astonishments: Charlotte Moorman and the Avant Garde, 1960s-70s. He has presented his research at numerous conferences, including the North American British Music Studies Association, Medieval/Renaissance Music, Sixteenth Century Studies, Renaissance Society of America, Society for Music Theory, and American Musicological Society. Jason's research has been supported by a Dr. Gudrun Busch Fellowship from the Herzog August Bibliothek (Wolfenbüttel, Germany), and a grant from the Gladys Krieble Delmas Foundation for archival research in Bergamo, Italy. Additionally, Jason is a Graduate-Scholar-In-Residence at the Newberry Library in Chicago.

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Joachim Schamberger

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Director of Opera, Bienen School of Music. Director, Orfeo Remote.

Joachim Schamberger has gained great acclaim as an international stage director and video designer. His productions have appeared in the United States, Germany, Italy, France, Czech Republic, Brazil, Norway, Israel, Japan and China. In addition to directing and designing, Schamberger is an avid opera educator. He is on the faculty at many young artist festivals and guest lectures at conservatories throughout the world. He most recently served as visiting professor of opera at DePauw University from 2011-2017. Schamberger’s expertise includes vocal and dramatic interpretation as well as style and language coaching.

A native of Germany, Schamberger is a graduate of the Musikhochschule in Würzburg, the Hochschule für Musik und Darstellende Kunst Mannheim, and the Merola Opera Program of the San Francisco Opera. He studied digital film production and 3-D animation at the New York Film Academy.

For more information, visit his website.

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Nicholas Lin

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Voice & Opera Program Student, Bienen School of Music. Vocalist, role of Orfeo.

 

Jason Rosenholtz-Witt

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PhD Candidate, Musicology, Bienen School of Music

Jason Rosenholtz-Witt is a PhD candidate in the musicology program and a Northwestern Presidential Fellow. His dissertation, "Musical Networks on the Borders of the Venetian Republic, 1580–1630," examines the mediation and circulation of music through social and professional networks with an emphasis on Bergamo, a thriving musical center during this period. By documenting the movement of both physical musical objects and ephemeral ideas, Jason’s research reveals a complex and international network of musicians, composers, artists, scribes, patrons, religious figures, and diplomats engaged in musical production. He earned a Bachelor’s in double bass performance from the University of Northern Colorado (2005), and a Master’s in performance from Colorado State University (2011). Between degrees, Jason spent four years teaching English in Hiroshima, Japan. He has published on seventeenth-century music in The Viol and Early Music Performer. Jason maintains a secondary interest in twentieth-century experimentalism and contributed a chapter in A Feast of Astonishments: Charlotte Moorman and the Avant Garde, 1960s-70s. He has presented his research at numerous conferences, including the North American British Music Studies Association, Medieval/Renaissance Music, Sixteenth Century Studies, Renaissance Society of America, Society for Music Theory, and American Musicological Society. Jason's research has been supported by a Dr. Gudrun Busch Fellowship from the Herzog August Bibliothek (Wolfenbüttel, Germany), and a grant from the Gladys Krieble Delmas Foundation for archival research in Bergamo, Italy. Additionally, Jason is a Graduate-Scholar-In-Residence at the Newberry Library in Chicago.

Joachim Schamberger

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Director of Opera, Bienen School of Music. Director, Orfeo Remote.

Joachim Schamberger has gained great acclaim as an international stage director and video designer. His productions have appeared in the United States, Germany, Italy, France, Czech Republic, Brazil, Norway, Israel, Japan and China. In addition to directing and designing, Schamberger is an avid opera educator. He is on the faculty at many young artist festivals and guest lectures at conservatories throughout the world. He most recently served as visiting professor of opera at DePauw University from 2011-2017. Schamberger’s expertise includes vocal and dramatic interpretation as well as style and language coaching.

A native of Germany, Schamberger is a graduate of the Musikhochschule in Würzburg, the Hochschule für Musik und Darstellende Kunst Mannheim, and the Merola Opera Program of the San Francisco Opera. He studied digital film production and 3-D animation at the New York Film Academy.

For more information, visit his website.

Nicholas Lin

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Voice & Opera Program Student, Bienen School of Music. Vocalist, role of Orfeo.

 


Orfeo Remote

Orfeo Remote

The Bienen School’s spring 2020 opera will proceed as an experimental opera film entitled Orfeo Remote. Both instrumentalists and singers will record audio and video via the internet, guided by director Joachim Schamberger and conductor Stephen Alltop.
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